Tag Archives: Fikret Berkes

Conservation Social Science

Conservation Biology has published three ‘virtual issues’ of Conservation Biology for the International Year of Biodiversity.  The issues each include 10-15 previously published articles from Conservation Biology, but access to these articles is now free of charge.  The virtual issues are:

Two of my articles are in the “Conservation Social Science” issue.  The first article was a collaboration with my Smith Fellows cohort, and the second was written by Tim Holland, who did his Masters with Andrew Gonzalez and I.

Resilience colleagues also have two papers reprinted, the first in the climate change special issue, and the second also in the social science issue

NASEBERRY and 2-mode network analysis of a dynamic co-management process

A network approach to understand co-management, governance and complex social-ecological systems is becoming part of the toolbox used by researchers in our field, now recently in an article by Marín and Berkes (see below). A bunch of us is trying to form a community of researchers to exchange ideas on how to use network analysis in social-ecological studies and to join our NASEBERRY group, you can mail me (Henrik Ernstson, henrik(at)ecology.su.se).

Andrés Marín and Fikret Berkes uses a 2-mode social network approach in their recent article entitled “Network approach for understanding small-scale fisheries governance“. They make the argument that many studies up until now have focussed on collaborative ties, which might miss how conflicts could drive the structuration of social networks:

[S]tudying only collaborative (or facilitating) relationships may show an incomplete representation of co-management. In the Chilean case, co-management appeared as a dynamic equilibrium between opposing forces: facilitation or collaboration and hindrance or conflict. The existence of conflict and power disputes should not be seen as blocking the functioning of the system but as a driver of change and adaptation [1]

NASEBERRY – A community would be great to have

Within the field of social-ecological network studies, several other studies are on their way in both marine, terrestrial and urban ecosystems. Further, at the upcoming international conference on social network analysis (SUNBELT) there is a special session on network analysis and natural resource management (June 2010), and several of us are participating in a book project led by Örjan Bodin and Christina Prell to further develop this field.

It is clear that several reserach groups are forming at various universities in the world, and at all continents. We hope our NASEBERRY group could be a good forum for many others to exchange exciting ideas. The name originates from “Network Analysis in Social-Ecological Studies” but has further borrowed its name from a long-lived evergreen tree growing in the Caribbean. The group include scholars that strive to advance both social, ecological and social-ecological network analysis in social-ecological studies. If you would like to join, please contact me Henrik Ernstson (henrik(at)ecology.su.se).

Naseberry tree<br />

Stay cool. Stay networked. Stay in the (naseberry)tree!


PS. Marín A, Berkes F. (2010; in press) Network approach for understanding small-scale fisheries governance: The case of the Chilean coastal co-management. Marine Policy. doi:10.1016/j.marpol.2010.01.007
[1] With reference to: Armitage et al 2007: Adaptive co-management. Univ Brit Col Press.

Expansion of social-ecological systems science

The concept of social-ecological systems has been gaining increased interested in science. Below is a graph showing papers whose topic includes social-ecological systems. During the 1990s there were a few publications and then a rapid rise during the 2000s.  Two influential books articulated social-ecological ideas:

Papers from ISI - social-ecological or social ecological and Systems

The top five journals are dominated by Ecology and Society:

  1. Ecology and Society (78)
  2. Global Environmental Change (13)
  3. Ecosystems (13)
  4. Proc. of National Academy of Science (USA) (10)
  5. Ecological Economics (8)

The most prolific authors are a group of people who are working to bridge the social and natural (with number of papers in brackets).  The top two authors, Carl and Fikret, were editors of the Linking and Navigating books.

  1. Carl Folke (26)
  2. Fikret Berkes (14)
  3. Steve Carpenter (14)
  4. Per Olsson (13)
  5. J. Marty Anderies (11)

The universities with the most publications are:

  1. Stockholm University (41) (where Carl Folke is located)
  2. Arizona State University (27) (where Marty Anderies and a number of SES researchers are)
  3. University of Wisconsin (19) (Steve Carpenter)
  4. University of Manitoba (18) (Fikret Berkes)
  5. Indiana University (14) (Elinor Ostrom and formerly Marco Janssen, both of whom have frequently published on social-ecological systems)

Roving Bandits 2.0


Red or precious coral Corallium rubrum, A proposal the regulate the trade, especially on the internet in this species was defeated at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. Photograph: Giovanni Marola/AFP/Getty Images

As a brief follow up to my previous post on Cyber-environmental politics, the Guardian and Techradar.com, both report on how the evolution of the Internet speeds up the extinction of endangered species, pretty much the same phenomena explored by Fikret Berkes and colleagues in Science in 2006 denoted “Roving Bandits”. The Guardian reports:

The internet has emerged as one of the greatest threats to rare species, fuelling the illegal wildlife trade and making it easier to buy everything from live lion cubs to wine made from tiger bones, conservationists said today.

The internet’s impact was made clear at the meeting of the 175-nation Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (Cites).

Delegates voted overwhelmingly today to ban the trade of the Kaiser’s spotted newt, which the World Wildlife Fund says has been devastated by internet trade.

A proposal from the US and Sweden to regulate the trade in red coral – which is crafted into expensive jewellery and sold extensively on the web – was defeated. Delegates voted the idea down mostly over concerns that increased regulations might damage poor fishing communities.

Trade on the internet poses one of the biggest challenges facing Cites, said Paul Todd, a campaign manager for the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

“The internet is becoming the dominant factor overall in the global trade in protected species,” he said. “There will come a time when country to country trade of large shipments between big buyers and big sellers in different countries is a thing of the past.”

New book on Adaptive Co-management

A new book on adaptive co-management has just been published by UBC press: Adaptive Co-Management: Collaboration, Learning, and Multi-Level Governance. A fair number of people who have been involved with resilience research have contributed to the book. I just received my copy in the mail and it looks great.

The book is a result of a project that has been coordinated by Canadian scientists Derek Armitage, Fikret Berkes, and Nancy Doubleday. They describe the book:

In Canada and around the world, governments are shifting away from regulatory models for governing natural and cultural resources. New concerns with adaptive processes, feedback learning, and flexible partnerships are reshaping environmental governance. Meanwhile, ideas about collaboration and learning are converging around the idea of adaptive co-management.

This book provides a comprehensive synthesis of the core concepts, strategies, and tools in this emerging field, informed by a diverse group of researchers and practitioners with over two decades of experience. It also offers a diverse set of case studies that reveal the challenges and implications of adaptive co- management thinking and synthesizes lessons for natural and cultural resource governance in a wide range of contexts.

Adaptive Co-Management is not only a timely book but also a useful concept for resource governance in a world marked by rapid socio-ecological change. It will be of interest to researchers, environmental practitioners, policy-makers, and students in fields across the political and environmental spectrum.

Table of Contents
1 Introduction: Moving beyond Co-Management / Derek Armitage, Fikret Berkes and Nancy Doubleday

Part 1: Theory

2 Adaptive Co-Management and Complexity: Exploring the Many Faces of Co- Management / Fikret Berkes

3 Connecting Adaptive Co-Management, Social Learning, and Social Capital through Theory and Practice / Ryan Plummer and John FitzGibbon

4 Building Resilient Livelihoods through Adaptive Co-Management: The Role of Adaptive Capacity / Derek Armitage

5 Adaptive Co-Management for Resilient Resource Systems: Some Ingredients and the Implications of Their Absence / Anthony Charles

Part 2: Case Studies
6 Challenges Facing Coastal Resource Co-Management in the Caribbean / Patrick McConney, Robin Mahon, and Robert Pomeroy

7 Adaptive Fisheries Co-Management in the Western Canadian Arctic / Burton G. Ayles, Robert Bell, and Andrea Hoyt

8 Integrating Holism and Segmentalism: Overcoming Barriers to Adaptive Co- Management between Management Agencies and Multi-Sector Bodies / Evelyn Pinkerton

9 Conditions for Successful Fisheries and Coastal Resources Co-Management: Lessons Learned in Asia, Africa, and the Wider Caribbean / Robert Pomeroy

Part 3: Challenges

10 Communities of Interdependence for Adaptive Co-Management / John Kearney and Fikret Berkes

11 Adaptive Co-Management and the Gospel of Resilience / Paul Nadasdy

12 Culturing Adaptive Co-Management: Finding “Keys” to Resilience in Asymmetries of Power / Nancy Doubleday

Part 4: Tools
13 Novel Problems Require Novel Solutions: Innovation as an Outcome of Adaptive Co-Management / Gary P. Kofinas, Susan J. Herman, and Chanda Meek

14 The Role of Vision in Framing Adaptive Co-Management Processes: Lessons from Kristianstads Vattenrike, Southern Sweden / Per Olsson

15 Using Scenario Planning to Enable an Adaptive Co-Management Process in the Northern Highlands Lake District of Wisconsin / Garry Peterson

16 Synthesis: Adapting, Innovating, Evolving / Fikret Berkes, Derek Armitage and Nancy Doubleday